four Coronavirus Tales Price Studying Proper Now

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It has never been more important to listen to the scientists, researchers and doctors found in the trenches of this pandemic struggling to have their voices heard – and to amplify the most accurate data and information. Fortunately, there are some incredible journalists who bring us these stories every day. Below we’ve rounded up the four that we found most compelling this week.

Week of December 4th


  • “Nobody listens to us”

    The Atlantic

    Outside of community efforts such as social distancing and wearing masks, the way we tackle the coronavirus depends on the ability of our healthcare professionals to deal with sick patients: are we staffed enough in hospitals? Do you have enough PPE? Enough beds? What treatments are there and do they work? While doctors and nurses are better informed and better equipped than they were earlier this year, those gains are threatened by the pandemic’s brutal third surge.

    CONTINUE READING

  •     How long distance COVID-19 drivers created a movement

    How long distance COVID-19 drivers created a movement

    medium

    For many COVID patients, whose symptoms persisted long after they expected to get better, treating their chronic condition has proven difficult. Those who never got a positive test fight believe their condition is related to the virus. So they organize: COVID long-distance drivers use online self-help groups to promote recognition, research and care – and conduct studies themselves to secure their place at the table.

    CONTINUE READING

  • Social distancing is a luxury that many cannot afford.  Vermont actually did something about it.

    Social distancing is a luxury that many cannot afford. Vermont actually did something about it.

    Vox

    In the US, there is an infection rate of 25 percent among people who are not resident. Vermont is the exception: there have been fewer than six COVID cases in Vermont’s homeless population, which is less than 1 percent. The state also has a low spread of coronavirus in general: its efforts serve as an important model for the country, showing not only how we can effectively address protecting our most vulnerable, but also how protecting our most vulnerable vulnerable people can protect us all.

    CONTINUE READING

  • Now is not the time to travel to indigenous nations in the United States

    Now is not the time to travel to indigenous nations in the United States

    Lifehacker

    As with most color communities in the United States, COVID-19 has a disproportionate impact on Native Americans: infection rates in Native Americans are 3.5 times higher than those in whites, and younger people are getting the virus in increasing numbers. To protect their own health, many indigenous nations exercise their sovereignty and urge people not to visit their areas.

    CONTINUE READING

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