The Significance of Cinema’s Completely happy Accidents

0

Welcome to The queue – Your daily distraction from curated video content from across the web. Today we’re going to watch a video of the importance of considering accidents while making a film.

There’s an old joke: if you want to make God laugh, make a plan. This is especially useful when making films. With so many deadlines, moving parts, and convenient decks, it’s almost certain that something will go wrong at some point. The fact that films are under the control of creatives whose job title is a jumbled syllable away from “dictator” makes this inevitability for error particularly tasty.

There are also some particularly compelling contradictions, such as the well-known control freak Stanley Kubrick – probably the outstanding perfectionist of the cinema – taking into account planned improvised shots. That’s exactly what they sound like: Takes where actors intentionally deviate from the script.

Indeed, that hard-learned balance between good planning and unexpected opportunity is one of the essential lessons of filmmaking. Without a degree of flexibility (and rolling cameras), the impressive splash wouldn’t have penetrated Children of men, the authentic response to extraterrestrial‘s first chest thrust, right? Midnight cowboyis notorious, often quoted as “Hey, I’m going here!”

As in life, there is an innate desire to control things on a movie set. Learning to relax, know what you need and stay open to moments of discovery isn’t easy, but it can lead to magic.

Clock “Embrace accidents“:

Who did that?

This video is from RocketJump film school, an on-going series of online filmmaking tutorials and educational essays. You can subscribe to their YouTube page here. And you can follow them here on Twitter.

More videos like this one

close

WANT MORE?

SIGN UP TO RECEIVE THE LATEST HEALTH FITNESS ,LIFESTYLE TIPS & TRICKS, PLUS SOME EXCLUSIVE GOODIES!

We don’t spam! Read our privacy policy for more info.

Leave A Reply

Your email address will not be published.